Review: Doctor Who – Dalek Universe 1

Review by Jacob Licklider


The Dalek Protocol started off the Dalek Universe miniseries with a fairly standard but enjoyable tale with no real connection to what would become the series at least based on the first set. And a day later, Dalek Universe begins itself properly with the first three stories in the miniseries being released to acclaim. To make what’s most likely going to be a long review short, Dalek Universe 1 is a brilliant start to the miniseries and if you haven’t already, go do yourself a favour and buy it. This is one of those sets that I cannot critically evaluate without losing my restraint on spoilers so from this point forward. You have been warned. Each installment of Dalek Universe 1 is truly part of a miniseries, blending together which helps as two of the episodes are from John Dorney, and the third deals with the character fallout from the previous two episodes before moving along to what will eventually become the conclusion of the set while transitioning into the second set. An interesting note, this set barely features the Daleks, like The Dalek Protocol before it, they are an off-screen presence bar a few scenes, the writers instead electing for setting this around the time of The Daleks’ Master Plan and dragging the Tenth Doctor out of time into his own personal timeline.

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Review: Dalek Universe – The Dalek Protocol

Review by Jacob Licklider


Hype is an interesting phenomenon. When Big Finish Productions announced Dalek Universe, of course there was going to be hype: it’s three whole box sets starring David Tennant as the Tenth Doctor, the return of Anya Kingdom, and a two-hour Fourth Doctor prologue with Leela and K9 to boot. This is the type of release that is designed to build hype, yet now that it is April and the first release is out, The Dalek Protocol starring Tom Baker, Louise Jameson, and John Leeson, and some of the trouble with extreme hype is that is can actually put off listeners. For The Dalek Protocol it is imperative that before you purchase or listen, you understand that it was never actually intended to be part of a bigger series. Recorded in 2018, the behind the scenes on the release are enlightening as Nicholas Briggs was simply commissioned to do what he loves and tribute Death to the Daleks while bringing back Anya Kingdom. This means that the ending of the story feels final, the Doctor and Anya don’t get to reunite which is important as the Doctor hasn’t even met her yet, and that there really aren’t apparent threads which will be carrying over to Dalek Universe proper. As a part of the series, it seems the most disconnected which is fine as it was never written to be a part of a greater whole, so listeners should be wary of those expectations before going in as you will not enjoy it nearly as much when that is in play.

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Audio Review: Carolyn Seymour in Conversation

Review by Ian McArdell


Carolyn Seymour in Conversation is the latest in an occasional range of in-depth interviews with Big Finish’s biggest stars. Perhaps best known in cult television circles for her starring role in the first series of Terry Nation’s Survivors, Carolyn Seymour has worked extensively on both sides of the Atlantic, on both stage and screen. In 2014 she reprised her role as Abby Grant in the audio continuation of Survivors, and has since appeared across a number of their ranges, most notably the Doctor Who spin-off Counter-Measures, where she plays the returning villainess, Lady Suzanne Clare.


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Review: ‘Vicious Dogs Attack Me In Sleepless Nights of Summer’ audiobook (A collection of prose from ‘Clerks’ actor Scott Schiaffo)

In ‘Vicious Dogs Attack Me In Sleepless Nights of Summer’ his bold collection of ‘prose, tales, and streams of semi-consciousness’, actor and musician Scott Schiaffo (Clerks, Vulgar) takes you through the depths of existential angst, addiction, and near-death experiences. This book reflects a troubling time in a gifted man’s journey. Schiaffo released this book of collected poetry and short stories in 2014. The book is a culmination of material written during 1986 through 1998, when the author was deep in the throes of alcoholism and drug addiction. He has now released a new audio book version for Audible; read by the author himself (also available on CD, Kindle or the original Paperback)

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Audio Review: Children of the Stones

Review by Ian McArdell


Children of the Stones is a new podcast audio drama, produced by BaffleGab for BBC Radio 4, and based on a story first presented in the 1977 HTV television series, which starred a pre-Blakes’s 7 Gareth Thomas. Famously terrifying, it follows the story of the Brake family, a father and son who move to Milbury; a village famous for its prominent circle of standing stones. This new interpretation, from writers AK Benedict and Guy Adams, comprises ten episodes which vary in length from twelve to twenty-one minutes, and runs to just over two and a half hours. The bones of the tale remain as before; although the writers have shifted a few of the pieces around to suit more modern ears.


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Audio Review: Dilation (B7 Media)     

Review by Ian McArdell


From writer and director Max Hochrad, Dilation is an unusual and thought-provoking time-travel tale told as a one-off, 75-minute drama. Continue reading

Audio Review: Wireless Theatre Company – Red Moon (Parts 5 & 6)

Review by Ian McArdell



Across the Fifth and Sixth phases of Red Moon, The Wireless Theatre Company’s six-part alternate history of the space race, we finally get to the core of the conspiracy surrounding SpaceCom’s Eagle One nuclear base. Continue reading

Audio Review: The Wireless Theatre Company – Red Moon 3&4

Review by Ian McArdell


With the third and fourth instalments of Red Moon, The Wireless Theatre Company’s six-part alternate history take on the space race, the conspiracy escalates and tensions spill over into action as two of our principal characters collide.

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Audio Review: Sherlock Holmes – The Master of Blackstone Grange

Review by Ian McArdell


Now in it’s fourth box-set, writer Jonathan Barnes has provided a slight twist with his latest Sherlock Holmes adventure. Rather than a four-part tale, this release consists of a three-parter, plus a single Christmas Special which was previously available as a download in the festive season. Continue reading

Audio Review: The Wireless Theatre Company – Red Moon

Review by Ian McArdell


From novels to films to comic books, ‘What If?’ tales and alternate histories are often compelling as they offer a rich playground of almost familiar events to play in. In just this vein, Red Moon looks at one of the pivotal moments in the 20th Century and poses the question… What if the Russians had beaten the Americans to the Moon? Continue reading