Review: The Lives of Captain Jack (Vol. 3)

Review by Jacob Licklider


The three sets thus far in The Lives of Captain Jack are an interesting experiment as while the Torchwood range is a continuation of that show and that very adult brand; The Lives of Captain Jack is contained with the ‘from the worlds of Doctor Who‘ banner. This means that there isn’t explicit adult content which expands the audience for this release to a much wider range of listeners. The third volume is the first story to be released by Big Finish Productions to feature both Jack Harkness as played by John Barrowman and Alex Kingston’s River Song; bringing together two of the most memorable characters from the revival. This gives fans a story that they have been asking for since both characters made a lasting imprint and Jack was supposed to appear with River in ‘A Good Man Goes to War’.

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Review: Doctor Who – Subterfuge

Review by Jacob Licklider


Helen Goldwyn writing a Doctor Who story set in World War II is an excellent pitch for Big Finish Productions to take up.  Goldwyn has extensive acting and directing experience, being a part of Big Finish Productions since the very beginning with her first work being in The Spectre of Lanyon Moor and The Secret of Cassandra.  Most recently she showed an incredible understanding of wartime as one of four writers on Louise Jameson’s Big Finish Original ATA Girl.  Subterfuge takes place at the tail end of World War II and deals with Winston Churchill’s campaign as leader of the Conservative Party and eventual loss to Clement Attlee, the Labour leader of the time who took the position of Prime Minister.  Ian McNeice returns to the role of Winston Churchill and is brought into conflict with Sylvester McCoy’s Seventh Doctor and Rufus Hound’s Meddling Monk.  Subterfuge juggles two distinct storyline tied into the campaign: first is the Monk’s attempts to get Churchill reelected and the second is a series of terrorist attacks by a group of aliens and spies that the Doctor has to find a solution to while dealing with the Monk’s meddling.

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Review: Doctor Who – First Doctor Adventures (Vol 4)

Review by Michael Goleniewski


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Review: Bernice Summerfield – The Glass Prison

Review by Jacob Licklider


The Bernice Summerfield Range is Big Finish’s flagship, running with releases since the company’s founding in 1998 with audios and novels being the two staples for the character, succeeding Virgin Publishing’s series of Benny novels.  With publishing audios and novels side by side, early story arcs crossed over and continued; often alternating between novel and audio, especially with the first five Benny novels and second series of Benny audios creating a difficult continuity when the books went out of print.  They infamously go to high prices to get editions of these books, but this problem has been uplifted in the past year as Big Finish Productions have produced audiobook readings of these books, all read by Benny herself, Lisa Bowerman. The final book in this sequence is Bernice Summerfield and the Glass Prison written by Jacqueline Rayner; which could easily be described as completing the character arc that the VNAs and the previous four Big Finish books had begun.  The audiobook production, like all of the previous Benny audiobooks, are the barebones readings with no music and no sound effects putting much of the weight on the reader’s shoulders.  Luckily, with Lisa Bowerman (who plays Benny) the listener is in safe hands. Bowerman takes the numerous characters in her stride, including those who appear in audios giving her best impression of actors like Stephen Fewell, Harry Myers, Steven Wickam, and Miles Richardson.  There is a real habitation of each character as Bowerman makes enough of a distinction between characters, so the listener knows who is speaking and has her own voice for the narration.  Continue reading

Audio Review: Blake’s 7 – Restoration (Part 3)

Review by Ian McArdell


Restoration Part 3 is comprised of four episodes, which conclude the current Blake’s 7 mini-series. Set towards the end of the on-screen Series C, the story has seen the crew of the Liberator undertake desperate measures to repair their ship, critically damaged during the recent power struggle between Servalan and the President of the Federation. While the title references the crew’s goal, it also fits the aims of the President; in the wake of recent conflicts, he is striving to re-establish his grip on power.

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Classic Doctor Who radio dramas starring the Third Doctor and Sarah Jane Smith released on vinyl!

BBC & Demon Records has released two Classic Doctor Who radio dramas ‘The Paradise of Death‘ and ‘The Ghosts of N-Space Continue reading

Review: Gallifrey – Time War (Vol 3)

Review by Michael Goleniewski


“Romana and Narvin are exiles, driven from Gallifrey by Rassilon’s regime and cut adrift amid the horrors of the Time War. Their one remaining hope is that they can find their friend: Leela was also lost in the maelstrom of battle, but she is fighting to survive…”

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Review: Torchwood – Dissected

Review by Jacob Licklider


Whenever Big Finish Productions decides to release a story that is a two-hander the listener is almost guaranteed a classic.  Most of the best Companion Chronicles are the experimental two-handers like Solitaire and The Time Museum, and Robert Shearman’s highly experimental Scherzo is a work of brilliant.  

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Review: Doctor Who – The Psychic Circus

Review by Jacob Licklider


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Review: Fourth Doctor Adventures – Series 9 (Vol 1)

Review by Michael Goleniewski


The ninth series of the Fourth Doctor Adventures takes several different directions in terms of structure and tone. Rather than being eight hour-long stories comprised of two parts, the series is now jumping to longer adventures with four two-hour-long stories instead. It also represents a significant time jump moving into the Fourth Doctor’s time in E-Space with Romana, K-9, and Adric rather than during his time with Leela or either of the Romanas individually. It’s an interesting jump considering most of the series are going to shorter formats nowadays but it could yield some intriguing results if done well.

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