Review: The Sixth Doctor Adventures – Water Worlds

Review by Jacob Licklider


Disability in Doctor Who has never been it’s strong suit. Perhaps the most prominent disabled character has been Davros, a genocidal maniac who created the Daleks, aka space Nazis whose purpose is exterminating all other life. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s there was a streak of characters with physical disfigurements as a mark of villainy, though by 1989 there was some small instances of complexity with disabled characters in Battlefield and The Curse of Fenric while the New Series has been mostly neutral in disability representation with some exceptions (Under the Lake/Before the Flood comes to mind for deaf representation). Oddly enough the 1960s were more progressive than much of the 1970s and 1980s with serials like Galaxy Four where the monstrous Rills being the good guys and The Dalek Invasion of Earth including a good scientist in a wheelchair who dies at about the halfway point of that story. So, here we are in 2022, and Big Finish Productions are once again making a push ahead of television series in terms of representation by introducing the first disabled Doctor Who companion in Dr. Hebe Harrison in The Sixth Doctor Adventures: Water Worlds, a marine biologist who uses a wheelchair. Like their push with trans representation in Rebecca Root’s Tania Bell, Hebe is played by disabled actress Ruth Madeley and producer Jacqueline Rayner worked closely with Madeley to ensure all three scripts from this set reflected disability representation well.

Continue reading

Review: Doctor Who – Mind Of The Hodiac

Review by Jacob Licklider


There isn’t often the opportunity to see some of the first work of an author that has gone on to make an impact. Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson had both early works published in some form (Jordan’s being published by hid wife and Sanderson publishing a first draft as a Kickstarter reward), yet with Big Finish it’s almost surprising that something like Mind of the Hodiac hasn’t happened sooner. Russell T. Davies found the initial script for Part One and storyline for Part Two in a box in 2020 when Emily Cook was doing the Lockdown watch-alongs on Twitter which he wrote at some point between 1986 and 1987 before even making it into TV, the first script he sent to the Doctor Who Production Office which was, of course, rejected. In finding the script, pictures were posted on Twitter of some of the pages as a treat and in Davies’ mind that was the end of that. But then Scott Handcock, director and writer for Big Finish, contacted Davies with Emily Cook in tow as one of the newer producers to acquire a copy of the script (apparently physically and not just scanned into a computer if the behind the scenes interviews are correct in its implication). Continue reading

Review: Doctor Who – Peladon

Review by Jacob Licklider


The 1963-1989 run of Doctor Who is fascinating in the fact that in the 160 serials (including The TV Movie in 1996), there are few stories that are direct sequels to previous stories, much less sequels within the same production team. Generally the closest you would get are stories like Attack of the Cybermen doing a sequel to The Tenth Planet and Attack of the Cybermen over a decade after the prequel’s release or Snakedance to Kinda and Mindwarp to Vengeance on Varos essentially being extensions of the themes of the previous story, but doing its own thing. The Curse of Peladon and The Monster of Peladon are an oddity as they both share the same setting, several of the characters, and feel like a natural extension of the same story. Peladon being the setting of both is a big factor in why the two stories feel so connected, the sets are the same and it feels like the planet is evolving and changing. The Curse of Peladon aired as the second story from Season 9 beginning at the end of January 1972, so as it is the 50th anniversary of Episode One while I am writing this, Big Finish Productions are celebrating with Peladon, a four story box set revisiting the planet throughout its history as well as continue the spirit of Peladon stories in reflecting the politics of the real world using allegory for a stark contrast of the good and bad of today’s world.

Continue reading

BBC Studios to release K9 audio annual

BBC Studios have today announced a brand new audio in their Doctor Who audio range K9 Audio Annual.

p00vh6kf


Continue reading

Big Finish brings lost Russell T. Davies story to life

A long-lost Russell T Davies Doctor Who story with some unfinished business is being brought to life on audio by Big Finish.


Continue reading

Seventh Doctor season 24 ‘The Collection’ BluRay announced

The BBC have announced that Sylvester McCoy’s first season as the Seventh Doctor, featuring a full season of Bonnie Langford as Melanie Bush, is the next release to come to Blu-ray with Season 24 as part of their ‘The Collection‘ range.

Continue reading

Sixth Doctor’s Adventures to get Blu-ray Release

Doctor Who: The Collection’ returns with Season 23, featuring Colin Baker as the iconic Time Lord.


Continue reading

Review: Doctor Who – The Quantum Possibility Engine

Review by Doctor Squee (Host of Gallifrey Stands Podcast)


As the 7th Doctor (Sylvester McCoy) and Ace (Sophie Aldred) are having a casual chat on the Tardis, Mel (Bonnie Langford) comes in and stuns them; taking the ship. But why? Can our mild mannered computer tech have turned evil? Is she working for Josiah W Dogbolter (Toby Longworth) who is now president of the solar System? And will the Doctor find help in the mostly unlikely of places? Continue reading

Review: Doctor Who – The Dispossessed

Review by Kenton Hall


Following the previous main range story Red Planets, I was looking forward to The Dispossessed; I’ve found myself enjoying the TARDIS team of the Doctor, Mel and Ace a lot more than I expected. Don’t get me wrong, I think great strides have been made with Bonnie Langford’s character on audio. And, perhaps most importantly, I was 13 when the Seventh Doctor and Ace were on TV. Like Ringo’s drums, they loom large in my legend. But there is a subtle chemistry between the two actors, only briefed tapped in their one joint TV story, that bubbles away nicely. 
Continue reading

Review: Doctor Who – Red Planets

Review by Kenton Hall


There are so many Seventh Doctors. From the clowning, malapropism-spitting first season, through to the increasingly sharp and mysterious Seven of Sylvester McCoy’s final two seasons, there has always been much to dissect about the era, not least of which is the happily temporary end of the show in 1989. Continue reading