Review: Doctor Who – Early Adventures (Series 7)

Review by Jacob Licklider


It is always a special day when Big Finish Productions revives a range previously thought ended. The Lost Stories easily come to mind over the past few years having two series of previously unseen stories released over the last three years, and after another near two year break The Early Adventures returns for a seventh series of two releases celebrating the William Hartnell era of the show. This year also perhaps went in a different direction in connecting both stories as a sequel and a prequel to 1960s stories, the first giving the audience an idea of what happened to Susan immediately after The Dalek Invasion of Earth while the other shows just how the Doctor acquired the Holy Ghanta seen in The Abominable Snowmen. Like Series 6 of The Early Adventures each story is told at different ends of the First Doctor’s life, the first being right near the beginning of his travels while the second being right near the end with his last regular TARDIS team, both focusing deeply on the companions and their time with the Doctor and just what it means to be a companion in these early days of Doctor Who and how that role has changed over the years.


The first release is After the Daleks by Roland Moore and is odd for a release in that it doesn’t feature the Doctor. Set in the immediate aftermath of The Dalek Invasion of Earth, just as the TARDIS has dematerialised and Susan has dropped her key to the TARDIS. As the title implies it’s all about how humanity can pick up the pieces after the Dalek forces have all been defeated, and despite having a Dalek emblazoned on the cover, they don’t actually play an active role in the plot. The entire story is focused directly on humanity and what the Daleks have left behind: Susan is finding her equilibrium in the decision that her grandfather made for her, Jenny Chaplin has found her robotised brother and is attempting to save his life, and David is trying to get some sort of government. The Daleks are a threat which could always be coming back and there is a single Dalek left alive, immobilised, planning and scheming to find a way to retake the Earth.

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Review: Doctor Who – Early Adventures (Series 6)

Review by Jacob Licklider


The Early Adventures range from Big Finish Productions is a chance to tell full cast stories with the characters from the 1960s eras from Doctor Who. The range has currently run five series alternating between the First and Second Doctors, and this month the sixth series was released, however, instead of the standard four release across the final four months of the year there were only two. While truncating this series to two means less content, the sixth series is a prime example of quality over quantity from a range that has already had some of the strongest stories featured. This series, while being firmly part of the Second Doctor’s era, is a celebration of the 1960s era of Doctor Who as a whole creating a “what if” idea of a Fifth Anniversary Celebration.

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Review: Doctor Who Early Adventures – Entanglement

Review by Doctor Squee (Host of Gallifrey Stands Podcast)


When the Doctor, Steven (Peter Purves) and Vicki (Maureen O’Brien) arrive in the 1930’s. When they get out of the Tardis it has a fall. As they try to get it recovered they seek refuge in the local Sedgwick College. The colleges Provost is missing and a leadership race is underway to replace him. But where did the prior leader go? And why are the students suddenly experiencing strange angry outbursts? Thing will only get weirder.

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Review: Doctor Who – The Early Adventures – The Dalek Occupation of Winter

Review by Doctor Squee (Host of Gallifrey Stands Podcast)


Let’s start with what an awesome title this is, harkening back to the way they used to have more poetic story names. And this tells you a lot about the style of this piece by David K Barnes. It does in many ways go back to the classic story telling of Doctor Who, as these early adventures tend to. What’s striking about this one for me is how it also blends in a lot of modern techniques of writing and characters whilst making them fit perfectly. Take the character of Jacklyn Karna (Sara Powell). She feels like a modern villain but the Doctor uses very old-school techniques to wrong-foot her and it’s great.

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Review: Doctor Who Early Adventures – The Wreck Of The World

Review by Doctor Squee (Host of Gallifrey Stands Podcast)


This is a lovely second Doctor story with Jamie & Zoe that perfectly mirrors the style of the time the story would fit into on TV; but as writer Timothy X Atack tells us in the extras, maybe a script that might not have been made due to budget.

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Review: Doctor Who – The Morton Legacy

Review by Kenton Hall


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Review: Doctor Who Early Adventures – The Outliers

Review by Doctor Squee (Host of Gallifrey Stands Podcast)


Anneke Wills (Polly, narrator) and Frazer Hines (Jamie, 2nd Doctor) lead the cast of this 2nd Doctor adventure.

In the distant future on an alien planet, people are going missing, but at a rate few know as statistics are altered. Why the deception? Who is taking people? And will the Doctor and his friends be the next to be taken? Continue reading

Review: Doctor Who Early Adventures – The Night Witches

 Review by Kenton Hall


The Early Adventures which are, in many ways, the natural evolution of the Companion Chronicles, have been a fascinating mix of the narrated style of those stories and the full-cast plays of the Main Range. Both allow audiences to revisit the eras of Doctors (and, at times, Companions) who are no longer with us.

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Review: Doctor Who – The Ravelli Conspiracy

My relationship with Doctor Who started, perhaps; in slightly different place than many North Americans of my age and fighting weight. I often read of Canadians and Americans who first discovered the good Doctor via PBS; usually beginning with Tom Baker and working their way forwards and backwards as the addiction set in.

The first episode of Doctor Who that I ever saw; thanks to a television station called YTV, was “An Unearthly Child”. I’d heard of the show; being a science fiction fan and having the benefit of British parents, but this was my first real exposure. Every day, after school, a new episode. I was hooked. Before long, I was haunting every bookstore I could locate, looking for Target novelisations, New Adventures and Missing Adventures; everything, in fact, I could find that was even slightly related to the show. The logo began to festoon every school binder and scrap of paper within reach of my fevered hands.

Having started at the beginning, unlike many younger fans, the Hartnell and Troughton eras hold a particular nostalgia for me,although without the benefit of an Internet, the jumping around that set in as the series progressed was a trifle confusing. (Not to mention the sudden disappearance of the show from the air once we’d finally reached Survival.)

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Review: The Third Doctor Adventures – Volume 2

Review by Doctor Squee (Host of Gallifrey Stands Podcast)


The Transcendence of Ephros
The planet of Ephros is due to die of natural causes and some of the inhabitants are over the moon about it, as their religion tells them they can use the planets destruction to ascend. Meanwhile the Galactux Power Inc is mining what is left of the planets natural resources. When the Doctor and Jo arrive on the planet and get in broiled in the goings on, could there be more that meets the eye happening here?

This is a good story with lots going on and some great characters. Sometimes Bernard Holley is a little ‘large’ as a character as Karswell but he and the rest of the cast do a great job on the whole in this one.

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