Review: Doctor Who – Ravenous 4

Review by Jacob Licklider


The finales for the Eighth Doctor box sets have always had difficulty tying things together into a satisfying conclusion, so I was apprehensive going into Ravenous 4. The three previous sets in the Ravenous series, however, had set themselves apart by telling stories where the arc isn’t nearly as comprehensive or built up as Dark Eyes or Doom Coalition. Big Finish setup the Ravenous as a great evil with motivation of devouring everything in its sight and being difficult to beat, unlike previous miniseries with conspiracies going deep into Time Lord mythology and the precursor to the Time War. Ravenous does not include this baggage, allowing the miniseries to feel more laid back allowing the listener to enjoy the ride. This kept me optimistic for the fourth installment, which was then announced to feature four incarnations of the Master and the Eleven and hype began to set in. Because this release was only this month, this review will remain largely spoiler free.

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Review: The Diary of River Song – Series 5

Review by Doctor Squee (Host of Gallifrey Stands Podcast)


River is back to her Big Finish audio best; but instead of following the timeline of her hubby, she is following the life and faces of his Timelord nemesis, the Master. Continue reading

Doctor Who TV Movie 20th Anniversary: Interview with Yee Jee Tso

 

downloadToday marks the 20th Anniversary of the first broadcast of the Doctor Who TV Movie in the USA.

We caught up with actor Yee Jee Tso known for his role as ‘Chang Lee’ to talk about the lasting impact of the film 20 years later. Continue reading

Interview with Yee Jee Tso (Doctor Who TV Movie)

2We spoke with actor Yee Jee Tso known for his role as ‘Chang Lee’ in the Doctor Who Telemovie (1996).

“Making movies is awesome!”


What inspired you to become an actor?
I kind of fell into my first couple of gigs actually, by luck. On the 2nd occasion, filming was on location at an abandoned railway tunnel. The entire cast was dressed in 1890s period attire, and the set was decorated with historical accuracy as a coolie camp. “Coolie” was the term used for Chinese immigrant railway workers. I was sitting on an “apple box” and directly in front of me was the camera crane in all its technological glory and coolness, set against the historic backdrop in a surreal juxtaposition. That moment was when I got hooked. “Making movies is awesome!” I thought (or something to that effect). Continue reading